Posts tagged "law"

birchbone:

queensassyofthefatties:

Lewis’s law is an observation she made in 2012 that states “the comments on any article about feminism justify feminism.” Lewis has written frequently about misogynist hate directed at women online.[8]

Can we just repeat that a few more times, 

“The comments on any article about feminism justify feminism.”

“The comments on any article about feminism justify feminism.”

bolded is important

(via toriinn)

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New Korean Laws - 아청법

teaat2am:

toffmikin:

THIS CONCERNS THOSE WHO KNOW AND REBLOG FROM KOREAN TUMBLR USERS

The Korean government has recently passed a law that says, in it’s most basic form, “Anyone found as a creator, seller, or buyer of materials containing adolescent pornography will be punished as a sexual offender.”

Okay, well, that makes sense to stop the production of such things, they’re no good after all, right?

This wouldn’t be such a problem if the rules weren’t as ambiguous as hell.

More specifically, the law states the following counts

  • Any appearances that could be seen as a teen/child
  • Any type of pornography from explicit sex to being semi-nude (think mini skirts or swimming suits)
  • Any media from illustrations, games, videos, films, etc.

Of course, it is purely up to the investigator to decide if the subject is an adolescent or not, or if the act is porn or not.

This means I could draw an 80-year-old man in just shorts, and be sent to jail if the investigator thinks the man looks like a teenager in a revealing outfit.

Jail?  Surely I am exaggerating? But no, it is the truth: people who are caught breaking this law can be either sent to prison for several years or fined a 20,000$ equivalent, and they will lose their job in the entertainment industry.

Who’s in danger?  Anyone who is a Korean citizen, regardless of where they live.  Illustrators and animators in America can be removed with no consequence, and even small freelance artists and game developers can lose their jobs and have their projects revoked.

Personal privacy is no issue either; sending a picture to a friend via SMS can and will land you a place in jail if the material is considered adolescent porn.  Even worse, the government has set up a system where people can get paid for turning others in who violate this law.  One person had even linked 1700 personal websites, many of which were casual art blogs for Korean artists.

How can you help?  First, stop reblogging the works of Korean artists on Tumblr, and delete any posts if the original post has been deleted.  Even if the original post is gone, Tumblr will still link to the blog that posted it, revealing the creator. Second, spread the word.  Let people know that this new law has already caught hundreds of artists who’s art is considered pornographic only by the police. Finally, respect those who have decided to delete their website or blog.  They have done it to ensure that no one can falsely turn them in or be unfairly thrown in prison.

This a ridiculous law, but it’s been passed and has caused a huge issue in the Korean online community.  Any media before September 2012 is safe, but after that the law is in place.  Please help Korean artists to stay safe!

If you have any questions, there is an English-speaking website that you can send comments and concerns to.

I actually had a very good discussion with my fellow Korean artists via twitter and this is actually a serious issue.

As you might or might not know, I’m a Korean citizen currently living in the US.   While I don’t condone child pornography and I don’t really draw porn, this affects so much more than the right to draw fandom pairings from anime or games.  This is a way of censorship and you could be drawing your OC which has been clearly established as a legal adult but the government can decide they look too young as in ‘anime’ styles (for a lack of better terms) age is a bit more ambiguous in drawings.

The law changes the “clearly can be seen as a child/adolescent” to “can be seen as a child/adolescent” which means that it’s solely up to the reviewer whether it’s safe or not.

This means that anyone suspected of having such material are subject tothe government to go through all your personal conversations whether it was through skype or text or any other form of sns.

This is bordering dangerously on a form of censorship in a country where there were issues with government censorship and dictatorship even just 30 yrs ago.

Please, if you have any pictures that have explicit material drawn by me that you have it reposted anywhere, please take it down.

(via fujinroku)

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By the Time You Read this, I will Be a Criminal.

nissie:

On October 3, 2012 (in my timezone, which would be early October 2 for most of you), I and millions of internet users in the Philippines have officially become criminals, liable to be jailed for up to 12 years.

I will understand if you don’t care. After all, the Philippines seems like such a small, inconsequential place for most to bother with. But if you believe in the right to free speech, the right to express yourself even when you’re in the minority, then please. Listen, understand. Help us spread the word, get others to condemn this act, for one simple reason: the restricting of one’s freedom to express ideas, thoughts, and opinions, for whatever reason, is wrong.

On October 3, a law called the Cybercrime Prevention Act takes into effect in the Philippines. While this sounds very right and proper, this particular law bans (among other things that should be rightfully banned, like hacking, child pornography, and the like) cybersex and online libel.

Well, you think. Online libel can’t be that bad.

Oh, it gets worse.

The Philippine definition of online libel is best summed up as “anything that can be misconstrued as criticism against any one individual, regardless of whether it is the truth or otherwise”.

Criticizing a corrupt politician constitutes online libel.

Complaining about inefficient administration constitutes online libel.

The problem with the Philippine definition is that online libel is so broad and unspecific that nearly anything you say can be counted as it, as long as it’s in opposition to what the ‘injured’ party says. The fact that it is so broad enables politicians or people in positions of power to exercise this law against people with dissenting opinions or to stamp out critics, regardless of whether the latter is in the right.

And libel is criminalized here. It’s not a civil suit. (This is a throwback to the days of America’s shaky colonial rule over the Philippines, where libel was criminalized to dissuade critics. This was in the 1940s. No one has thought of changing it since.) With regards to curtailing freedom of speech and content, it is in many ways similar to the previously squashed SOPA bill. Even worse, considering the jailtime.

Oh, wait. There’s more. You’re going to love this.

1. Liking, tweeting or resharing said ‘online libel’ will also mean YOU get jailtime, too. It doesn’t matter if you didn’t write the original entry.

2. Posts, likes, and tweets are retroactive. That means they can jail you for posts, tweets, or likes you’ve made BEFORE the law went into effect, as far back as 2009.

3. Sarcasm still counts as libel.

4. The Department of Justice can block your access to the internet or to other computer files without a search warrant.

5. Convictions can mean up to twelve years of jail time or a P1,000,000 fine (about $20,000. Minimum wage is roughly $10 a day, but usually for jobs with a diploma. Actual wages can go 50% lower than stated, and that’s a GOOD wage for most of the poor).

6. Then they can charge you again for another law that bans printed libel, resulting in more jailtime. They do not apply double jeopardy in this case.

Cybersexing is a crime, too. Well, maybe child pornography can be avoided with this, right? Except child pornography has already been addressed by another law, it’s merely reaffirmed here. Owing to the Filipino lawmakers’ penchant for broadness, ‘cybersex’ is literally anything that constitutes “The willful engagement, maintenance, control, or operation, directly or indirectly, of any lascivious exhibition of sexual organs or sexual activity, with the aid of a computer system, for favor or consideration.” Sounds a lot like just plain ol’ pornography, don’t you think? The Philippines, I might add, is an industry geared toward exporting labor. This means husbands / wives are forced to find work abroad for better pay, and do not return home for months.

How did this all start?

Once upon a time, there lived this Senator called Vicento “Tito” Sotto III. He was against the Reproductive Health bill, which if passed, would provide contraceptives and sex education to the poor to minimize overpopulation in the city and infant / maternal death rates.He is a strong backer of the Philippine Catholic Church, which considers contraceptives akin to “abortion” (despite abortion not being a part of the RH bill. It is, in fact, still illegal). The Church has a strong hold in this country, with over 80% Catholics, and funds many politicians.

In Sotto’s speech where he denounces this bill, several bloggers and internet users discovered that he plagiarized text from at least five different U.S. bloggers, including one named Sarah Pope, and from another who was pro-choice, but twisted in his speech to sound anti-choice. Both bloggers expressed dismay at being plagiarized, and he was called out for it. Sotto refused to apologize, and claimed he hadn’t plagiarized because ‘she’s just a blogger’, despite his lawyer confirming that he, in fact, did.

In another speech, Sotto then plagiarized a portion of U.S. Senator Robert Kennedy’s speech, then claimed this was not the case, as the text had been converted to Filipino. Therefore, he argued, it can’t be plagiarized because Robert Kennedy can’t speak Filipino.

You might at this point begin to realize the quality of intelligence of some of the senators here.

Bloggers and internet users refused to back down. Sotto then issues a veiled threat regarding ‘regulating blogging’. A few days later, he inserts an online libel provision to the CyberCrime Prevention Act bill that was not present during previous readings of the bill, which was duly passed with only one dissenting vote from a Senator Guingona.

President Noynoy Aquino then proceeded to sign it into law. The irony is not lost on many of us here. His father, Ninoy Aquino, was an advocate for freedom of speech during the 1970s martial law, and literally gave up his life in the process for it. Ninoy’s popularity is what ushered his relatively inexperienced son into office - only to sign what constitutes as E-Martial law instead.

A couple of senators later came forward to admit that they hadn’t read the amendment clearly, which makes it all the more frightening that they voted for something they didn’t even understand in the first place.

The Reproductive Health bill has been in limbo for nearly fourteen years in the Philippines. Same goes for the Freedom of Information Act, which would ensure government transparency. And yet this bill with its controversial clause was enacted into law within DAYS.

Facebook accounts turn black in protest, the law is trending on Reddit. Human rights groups have condemned this law. Anonymous Philippines has been active. Forbes has spoken out against it. But government here has been notorious for turning a blind eye and a deaf ear to the protests of the people, instead pandering to cronies and corruption instead.

Sometimes I can’t help but admire friends living in Western countries. Vote republican or democrat, this labor party or that, but you are still free to express yourselves however you may. Living in a country where religion is the all-powerful, I can no longer say the same. Many people believe this is a ruse to take people’s attention away from the RH bill, and I don’t disagree.

But despite all this, many of my fellow Filipinos refuse to back down, and have resolved to continue posting, liking, tweeting, and resharing what they like, regardless of consequence. Because when you back down, they win. It’s as simple as that.

So for any of you people it will be a normal day at October 3 (or 2), 2012.

I, on the other hand, will be living in October 3, 1970, because this law has just set this nation’s progress at least forty years back.

Be thankful for the freedom that you have, and keep fighting for it.

That’s what we’re doing.

The Cybercrime Prevention Act law.

[ Image credit to Mr. Bawagan, who I will not link to here for reasons fairly obvious in this post.]

(via priestess-of-blood)

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moreglubbinchances:

armageddonadjuvant:

sonicviagra:

lemonlimevanilla:

NO TO CYBERCRIME LAW!
Senators who voted YES:Sen. Tito SottoSen. Bong RevillaSen. Manny VillarSen. Lito Lapid
Sen. Koko PimentelSen. Jinggoy EstradaSen. Loren LegardaSen. Chiz EscuderoSen. Ping LacsonSen. Gringo HonasanSen. Pia CayetanoSen. Bongbong MarcosSen. Ralph Recto
***I didn’t vote for your President, FYI.
Sign the petition HERE
Read more

Please signal boost, guys.
The Philippines need media coverage around the world if they hope to have any chance at repealing this shit.
To put things short, this bill is SOPA and ACTA’s demon spawn.
It was signed in at an inconvenient time, purposely for political reasons. This bill will restrict the voice of anyone who wishes to speak out against their politician, and is so vague and convoluted that 12-year jail time can be smacked on anyone for the most absurd reasons.

[ ooc i know but this is relevant to me
i am a citizen of the philippines and this law threatens my freedom on the internet
if you could spread this around it would be much appreciated thank you ]

A lot of the blogs I and my friend follow are suddenly either down or password protected; they didn’t even allow 2 days for this law to pass, certainly not enough time for the public to react, and began acting on it within half a day (this morning), and already have many people in jail for up to 12 years. 
This is the ultimate social justice act; not only is it ACTA/PIPA/SOPA combined, if you reblog, post, follow a blog that posts, +like, or otherwise interact with material that could potentially be offensive to someone, you’re immediately in some form of trouble with the law. I don’t know how severe, specifically, depending on what the ‘crime’ is.
Signal boost this, please.))

moreglubbinchances:

armageddonadjuvant:

sonicviagra:

lemonlimevanilla:

NO TO CYBERCRIME LAW!

Senators who voted YES:

Sen. Tito Sotto
Sen. Bong Revilla
Sen. Manny Villar
Sen. Lito Lapid

Sen. Koko Pimentel
Sen. Jinggoy Estrada
Sen. Loren Legarda
Sen. Chiz Escudero
Sen. Ping Lacson
Sen. Gringo Honasan
Sen. Pia Cayetano
Sen. Bongbong Marcos
Sen. Ralph Recto

***I didn’t vote for your President, FYI.

Sign the petition HERE

Read more

Please signal boost, guys.

The Philippines need media coverage around the world if they hope to have any chance at repealing this shit.

To put things short, this bill is SOPA and ACTA’s demon spawn.

It was signed in at an inconvenient time, purposely for political reasons. This bill will restrict the voice of anyone who wishes to speak out against their politician, and is so vague and convoluted that 12-year jail time can be smacked on anyone for the most absurd reasons.

[ ooc i know but this is relevant to me

i am a citizen of the philippines and this law threatens my freedom on the internet

if you could spread this around it would be much appreciated thank you ]

A lot of the blogs I and my friend follow are suddenly either down or password protected; they didn’t even allow 2 days for this law to pass, certainly not enough time for the public to react, and began acting on it within half a day (this morning), and already have many people in jail for up to 12 years. 

This is the ultimate social justice act; not only is it ACTA/PIPA/SOPA combined, if you reblog, post, follow a blog that posts, +like, or otherwise interact with material that could potentially be offensive to someone, you’re immediately in some form of trouble with the law. I don’t know how severe, specifically, depending on what the ‘crime’ is.

Signal boost this, please.))

(via priestess-of-blood)

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3liza:

ACTA passed one of the several voting gates it needs to get through before becoming law.
It was ratified in Poland last night.  This was the scene at Polish parliament afterwards, as (presumably) a bloc of anti-ACTA politicians expressed their displeasure and, perhaps without knowing it, foretell of the Anonymous repercussions to this bill.
EDIT: Just so we’re clear, this does not mean ACTA has been signed into international law.  It means that it’s getting much closer to being signed into law.
Some things you should know:
Online petitions are meaningless.  While they are well-intentioned and organized, the signing of a digital petition takes about twenty seconds, and does not require that you leave your beanbag chair in the coal cellar.  Politicians know this, and pay just as much attention to online petitions as is warranted by a “political action” that is literally less strenuous than leaving a YouTube comment.
Nothing except direct action is going to do a goddamn thing.  This means getting out in the street, it means DDoSing, it means vicious and widespread boycotts, site blackouts, and other strongarm tactics that actually impact the flow of money from corporations to lobbyists to politicians.  How do you, as a tiny flailing consumer, do this?  You can’t, really.  You can join up with groups that are intent on doing actions that actually mean something, adding your voice to a chorus of hundreds or thousands, instead of screaming alone.  You can contact celebrities, the spokespeople of our time, as ask them to leverage their followers on the issue.  You can write to Tumblr and ask for more blackouts.  None of these things will be very effective, so don’t be too disappointed when they don’t work, but they sure as fuck are more effective than online petitions, and the intense response to SOPA by corporations and consumers was responsible for getting it “tabled” (not dead, but dreaming lies).
ACTA was already signed in the US by Obama in September of 2011.  He had been praising the bill for over a year prior, and signed it without reservation.  Most of us didn’t hear about it, and he likely used the 9/11 coverage to make sure of that.
Eventually, one of these bills will pass, and the pro-corporate laws will go into effect.  Expect it.  Be prepared.  Learn to circumvent this garbage and you’ll have a leg up when the feds shut down the internet as we know it.
The best thing you can do now is install Tor and learn how to use it.  Tor is free software and an open network that helps             you defend against a form of network surveillance that             threatens personal freedom and privacy, confidential business             activities and relationships, and state security known as traffic analysis.  In order to circumvent the coming corporate takeover of the web, we’re going to have to go underground, creating a sub-internet of encrypted nodes known as a “darknet”.  It’s probably going to be like the internet was in the beginning, with most people only seeing what AOL wanted them to see, and only a small group of super-nerds existing outside of that bubble in the “real” internet.  It’ll take another twenty years for them to catch up to us again.
Welcome to the grim cyberpunk future.

3liza:

ACTA passed one of the several voting gates it needs to get through before becoming law.

It was ratified in Poland last night.  This was the scene at Polish parliament afterwards, as (presumably) a bloc of anti-ACTA politicians expressed their displeasure and, perhaps without knowing it, foretell of the Anonymous repercussions to this bill.

EDIT: Just so we’re clear, this does not mean ACTA has been signed into international law.  It means that it’s getting much closer to being signed into law.

Some things you should know:

  • Online petitions are meaningless.  While they are well-intentioned and organized, the signing of a digital petition takes about twenty seconds, and does not require that you leave your beanbag chair in the coal cellar.  Politicians know this, and pay just as much attention to online petitions as is warranted by a “political action” that is literally less strenuous than leaving a YouTube comment.

  • Nothing except direct action is going to do a goddamn thing.  This means getting out in the street, it means DDoSing, it means vicious and widespread boycotts, site blackouts, and other strongarm tactics that actually impact the flow of money from corporations to lobbyists to politicians.  How do you, as a tiny flailing consumer, do this?  You can’t, really.  You can join up with groups that are intent on doing actions that actually mean something, adding your voice to a chorus of hundreds or thousands, instead of screaming alone.  You can contact celebrities, the spokespeople of our time, as ask them to leverage their followers on the issue.  You can write to Tumblr and ask for more blackouts.  None of these things will be very effective, so don’t be too disappointed when they don’t work, but they sure as fuck are more effective than online petitions, and the intense response to SOPA by corporations and consumers was responsible for getting it “tabled” (not dead, but dreaming lies).

  • ACTA was already signed in the US by Obama in September of 2011.  He had been praising the bill for over a year prior, and signed it without reservation.  Most of us didn’t hear about it, and he likely used the 9/11 coverage to make sure of that.

  • Eventually, one of these bills will pass, and the pro-corporate laws will go into effect.  Expect it.  Be prepared.  Learn to circumvent this garbage and you’ll have a leg up when the feds shut down the internet as we know it.

  • The best thing you can do now is install Tor and learn how to use it.  Tor is free software and an open network that helps you defend against a form of network surveillance that threatens personal freedom and privacy, confidential business activities and relationships, and state security known as traffic analysis.  In order to circumvent the coming corporate takeover of the web, we’re going to have to go underground, creating a sub-internet of encrypted nodes known as a “darknet”.  It’s probably going to be like the internet was in the beginning, with most people only seeing what AOL wanted them to see, and only a small group of super-nerds existing outside of that bubble in the “real” internet.  It’ll take another twenty years for them to catch up to us again.

  • Welcome to the grim cyberpunk future.

(via spookylimit)

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the-infantata:

i’m gonna steal the declaration of independence

the-infantata:

i’m gonna steal the declaration of independence

(via beestiel-archive)

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chocotaur:

soysexy:

edoro:

demons:

rendezvoodoo:brolinskeep:


Global petitions:
Stop ACTA (to the UN)
Stop ACTA
Just Say ‘No’ to ACTA
Stop ATCA Now! 
Stop Canada from passing ACTA
UK representatives: Stop ACTA
Act against ACTA (to the U.S. Congress)
Citizens of Europe:
Contact your representatives!!!!!!
Go to http://www.europarl.org/, select your country (left columb) and then find the contacts of your representatives under “Parliament”, “Your MEPs” or something like this. AND LET THEM KNOW WHAT YOU THINK!
StopACTANowon Twitter
Stop ACTA Now! on Facebook

and for more/quick information on acta, here.

Hey y’all, if you thought the whole SOPA/PIPA was intense, you may want to check out ACTA (and also check out the fact that filesonic and uploaded are kaput).As someone just said, we all should have known World War III was going to be fought on the internet.

The first and last one are both from the same site and aren’t working for me, just fyi to anyone signing. I think the site might be having issues. All of the other ones work just fine though.

THESE PETITIONS SHOULD HAVE MORE THAN 194 SIGNATURES! SIGN IT PEOPLE, PLEASE!

All of those petitions are duplicates of ones with more signatures:
https://submissions.epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/20685
UK. This one has 4500 signatures.
https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions/%21/petition/end-acta-and-protect-our-right-privacy-internet/MwfSVNBK?utm_source=wh.gov&utm_medium=shorturl&utm_campaign=shorturl
This American one only needs 6000 more signatures to break the mark.
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/aboutparliament/en/00533cec74/Petitions.html
Directly Petition the EU parliament through this.

chocotaur:

soysexy:

edoro:

demons:

rendezvoodoo:brolinskeep:

Global petitions:

Stop ACTA (to the UN)

Stop ACTA

Just Say ‘No’ to ACTA

Stop ATCA Now!

Stop Canada from passing ACTA

UK representatives: Stop ACTA

Act against ACTA (to the U.S. Congress)

Citizens of Europe:

Contact your representatives!!!!!!

Go to http://www.europarl.org/, select your country (left columb) and then find the contacts of your representatives under “Parliament”, “Your MEPs” or something like this. AND LET THEM KNOW WHAT YOU THINK!

StopACTANowon Twitter

and for more/quick information on acta, here.

Hey y’all, if you thought the whole SOPA/PIPA was intense, you may want to check out ACTA (and also check out the fact that filesonic and uploaded are kaput).

As someone just said, we all should have known World War III was going to be fought on the internet.

The first and last one are both from the same site and aren’t working for me, just fyi to anyone signing. I think the site might be having issues. All of the other ones work just fine though.

THESE PETITIONS SHOULD HAVE MORE THAN 194 SIGNATURES! SIGN IT PEOPLE, PLEASE!

All of those petitions are duplicates of ones with more signatures:

https://submissions.epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/20685

UK. This one has 4500 signatures.

https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions/%21/petition/end-acta-and-protect-our-right-privacy-internet/MwfSVNBK?utm_source=wh.gov&utm_medium=shorturl&utm_campaign=shorturl

This American one only needs 6000 more signatures to break the mark.

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/aboutparliament/en/00533cec74/Petitions.html

Directly Petition the EU parliament through this.

(via otaku4life14)

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If the Internet Censorship law gets passed, our generation is basically dead.

(via priestess-of-blood)

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